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Investigate the Ancient Greeks Explore Character Traits of the Heroes
Discover the Myth Maker in You  |  Inspire others to be Good People

 

 

Table of Contents

Technology Tips
Quick Teaching Tips
"Must Have"  Ancient Greece Books
Activity Details From The Missions

 

 

Technology Tips

When you use a webquest with your students for the first few times it can be a little confusing for them.  After all, it is a new way of learning!  I suggest that you try the following suggestion to make everything go a little smoother.

Use a Smartboard, Projector, or a LCD Panel
Use a Smartboard, Projector, or a LCD Panel to show your students exactly what to do while you project the computer screen onto a white screen.  I often introduce a webquest by positioning the page so that the  Essential question is showing.  We can then discuss any past experiences or background knowledge that students have. If I am using the Smartboard I will write their ideas on the screen to print off and give to them later.  If I use the projector orLCD panel I will use Inspirations to record their ideas in a quick, organized, and visual way.  I will then print this and hand it out. 

Copy/ Paste/ Print
I often copy the introduction and the activity instructions to paste into a Microsoft Word document.  I will then print a copy off, make Zerox copies, and pass them out.  That way kids have a clear idea of what we are doing.  This saves me a ton of time because I no longer have to worry about procedural questions. My focus is on facilitating the discussions.

***I give you my permission to copy and print any of my materials found within my webquests for you to use with students in conjunction with the webquest. This is for educational use only.***


Books
Books!  Good ole' books.  Sometimes we get so wrapped up in the technologies that we forget that books have great information in them and are sometimes easier to use than a website.  I always have a cart of books relating to the topic we are studying.  Hit up the local library, get kids to bring in books, or purchase books from our Ancient Greece Bibliography.  I have some kids that always go straight to the books while others hit the computers.  When we are beginning I let them learn in a style and manner that is comfortable to them.

 

If you have any suggestions or strategies that really work for you while teaching using webquests please share them by e-mailing them to support@iwebquest.com. Thank you for your help.  Together, we can make better use of technology.

 

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Quick Teaching Tips

Reading and Myths

Myths are great stories to read in literature discussion groups.  Myths usually are  short but have a great deal of information packed into them.  I have found that students get excited about reading myths, can really grasp some of the underlying themes, and make connections to their own lives.  Myths often lead to some of the best literature discussions that my class has had.  

To structure our literature discussions our class developed these cooperative group jobs to ensure that each person plays an important role in making our discussion a deeper one.  

  1. Symposium Host   
    The Symposium Host prepares and leads the discussions.  They come with meaningful passages from the myth to share, ask thought provoking questions, lead discussions, and make sure that everyone is involved.  This job takes some work to get good at but kids have really wanted this job.  Because of the skills they gain here other literature group or class discussions have shown marked improvement.

  2. Who's Who of the Greek Gods
    There were so many Greek gods that my class was getting overwhelmed with who was who and what powers the gods had.  One student had a "stroke of genius" and suggested that we have one student make a chart of the gods, their characteristics, and their powers that were in the myth we were reading.  To make it even more exciting the student suggested that we use the computer program, Inspirations.  Inspirations is a great webbing, outlining, or brainstorming program that we use in our classroom and it really worked well here.

  3. It's all Greek to Me!
    The student who had this job became an expert in vocabulary.  The myths that we read often had difficult words. This person found four words that gave them  a bit of trouble.  They hypothesized what the word meant by using context clues and recorded their hypothesis.  Then, they looked up a definition in the dictionary.  During discussion group they would lead the vocabulary discussion by pointing us to the word, we would read the paragraph it was found in, and try to figure out what the word meant.  Finally, the student would give us the definition.  Our class was excited to find that many English words have their roots in Ancient Greece.

  4. Illustrator
    This student would study images of artifacts from Ancient Greece. They would try to emulate.  They had to include the title of the myth and create a catchy slogan to convince others to read this myth. The results were fantastic.  Kids not only loved the job and were proud of their posters (that we later made into a class book) but they led to some of the best discussions that we had.


  5. Action Assessor
    This student plotted the level of action at key points throughout the myth.  They used Microsoft Excel to create a line graph that showed the progression of the action throughout the course of the story.  Then, they led a discussion of the action with the other students in their group

 

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Writing and Myths

Learn to write Like an Ancient Greek
Kids love to learn how to write in a code or a foreign language.  Teach them the Greek Alphabet.  Then, set them free to write their names or anything else they want to using the alphabet of the ancient Greeks. 

 

Research and Report on the Places of Ancient Greece Myths
Most Greek myths are based in part on real happenings in Ancient Greece.  Most of the places that we hear about in Ancient Greek myths are real cities, towns, lakes, oceans....  Kids can gain a better perspective and a more in-depth understanding of the Myths they read if they know a little about the setting.  Use Investigate the Ancient Greeks to learn more about the places of Ancient Greece
.

 

Make a Poster Advertising an Ancient Greece Hero
Kids can have fun learning and then teaching others about the Ancient Greek heroes when you they make a poster.  Kids should use Explore Character Traits of the Heroes and Literature to learn background on the heroes of the Greek myths they read. Have students work in small groups to learn about one hero.  Make a poster to convince others to read the myths about their hero.  This is also a great opportunity to learn about the tricks that advertisers use to convince your students to do or buy something.

 

Create a Time line of Events in Ancient Egypt
While your students learn about Ancient Greece and the events that shaped their society have students keep track of important events.  Have students create a chart to keep track of these important dates.  Finally, have students work in pairs to use Timeliner to make a timeline Ancient Greece

 

The Family Tree of the Gods
Have students use Inspirations to create a family tree for the gods. Student should use Explore Character Traits of the Heroes to research the gods carefully to sort out their confusing family tree.  This can be work but it gives good insight to who is who in the myths.

 

Theatre and Myths

Put on your own Greek Play
Use your myths to stage a Greek theatrical production.  Have students make costumes, masks to wear and Greek delicacies to eat (Yummy!)

 

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Further Ancient Greek Teaching Tips

Mr. Donn's Ancient Greece Lesson ideas
Teacher's Companions
Climbing to the Top of Mt. Olympus
Myth Teaching Ideas

 

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"Must Have"  Ancient Greece Books

 

 

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Activity Details From The Missions

Mission 1:  Investigate the Ancient Greeks
Mission 2: Explore Character Traits of the Heroes
Mission 3: Discover the Myth Maker in You
Mission 4: Inspire others to be Good People

 

Mission 1:  Investigate the Ancient Greeks  (Activity Details)

Aristotle (a famous Greek philosopher) believed that people learned best and could be good people when they had clear guidelines or laws.  Your job will be to learn about what the Ancient Greeks felt made someone a good person and then develop a "Code of Conduct" that all citizens could follow to become good people.  Choose one behavior that the Ancient Greeks believed a good person would exhibit and create a PowerPoint Slide to teach others about these Ancient Greeks beliefs.  Combine each persons one slide to create a class "Code of Conduct" PowerPoint presentation. 

  1. Review what you have learned about daily life in Ancient Greece. Pay special attention to what you learn about the Ancient Greek beliefs in what made someone a good person.         

  2. Work cooperatively, in a small group to make a list of what behaviors the Ancient Greek people believed a Good Person would exhibit.

  3. Apply your knowledge of Ancient Greece to create a "Code of Conduct" that the citizens of  Ancient Greece could live and learn by to become good people.

  4. Choose one behavior that the Ancient Greeks believed a good person would exhibit. Use this idea to create a PowerPoint Slide to teach others about the behaviors that the Ancient Greeks believed made someone a good person.    When each person in you class has completed one slide combine all the slides into a class "Code of Conduct" PowerPoint presentation. 

 

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Mission 2: Explore Character Traits of the Heroes (Activity Details)

Create a Poster to teach others about one Ancient Greek belief of one behavior that makes the hero such a good person.  To gather ideas for your read several myths.  You will find some great myths in the books found under Great Greek Books.  Use the Online Resources to supplement your reading and to gain further insight into the wide array of heroes, gods, and monsters that you will read about.  When you're ready to create a poster Use a large poster size paper, flashy colors, catchy slogans, and your best art work to create a poster to attract peoples attention.  

  1. Read Several Myths.  You will find some great myths in the books found under Great Books.  

    Teachers Note:  Myths provide great opportunities for literature groups.  Check out the teachers page for some quick tips on how to structure your literature groups to get the best out of these myths.

  2. Use online resources to supplement your reading and to gain further insight into the wide array of heroes, gods, and monsters that you will read about.

  3. Make a quick list of the strengths that the hero of the myths show.  These could include their powerful strength, their ability to think under pressure, their good looks and charm, their never quit attitude...  The list of the heroes' strengths go on and on (that is a big reason why they are heroes.)

  4. Create a Poster to show one quality that that the Ancient Greeks thought made someone a good person.  Illustrate your poster with a hero of a Greek myth doing a deed that the Greeks would consider great.  Develop a catchy slogan to attract people to your poster so that they can learn about what the Ancient Greeks thought made someone a good person.

 

 

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Mission 3: Discover the Myth Maker in You (Activity Details)

Write your own original Greek myth using your modern hero as the main character. It will be your challenge to focus on the qualities of your modern hero that make him or her a good person while they embark on the adventure of a lifetime.  Your myth will send them on a fantastical adventure where they will face angry gods, wicked monsters, and unbelievable odds?  The only question is, "will your hero meet the challenge and overcome the great odds stacked against them?"

 

  1. Use the Online Resources that are available to find more about your modern hero.  Focus your investigation on the qualities that make your hero such a good person.

    Modern Hero Search 
    Search the web to Find Great Information about Your Modern Hero

    Google

     

  2. Use a Venn Diagram to compare the qualities that make your hero a good person and those qualities that the Ancient Greeks felt made their heroes such good people.  Are there similarities?  Are there differences?

  3. Write a Greek myth with your modern hero as the main charecter.  Your myth should exaggerate the qualities that make your hero a good person.  Your hero should face the Greek gods.  Make sure that your myth includes all the parts of a myth.

  4. Let the Myth Maker in you free as you write your best myth yet!

 

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Mission 4: Inspire others to be Good People (Activity Details)

Wow!  Can you believe that we are actually going to have an Ancient Greek Myth Festival?  We are going to be the hit of the school!  We have our job cut out for us though.  We are going to have to prepare and then practice oral telling of our myth Luckily, we have some great storytelling, or in this case mythtelling resources that we can investigate to learn how to really wow the crowd with some great mythtelling strategies.  We can prepare a Greek Costume (see Greek Clothing resources) and Greek Food (see Greek Food resources.)  We can really convince others to be good people with our myths.  Remember to send your idigital images from your festival to support@iwebquest.com so that you can have your pictures posted in our Mt. Olympus Mythtelling Hall of Fame.   

 

  1. Prepare and practice oral telling of our myth.  We are going to have to put the finishing touches on and practice telling our myths. Luckily, we have some great storytelling, or in this case mythtelling resources that we can investigate to learn how to really wow the crowd with some great mythtelling strategies.

  2. We can present the Greatest Ancient Greek Myth Festival in history.  If we can get a little help we can prepare a Greek Costume (see Greek Clothing resources) and Greek Food (see Greek Food resources.)  We can really convince others to be good people with our myths.

  3. Make sure that you have one of your class mates take pictures and video of the Ancient Greek Myth Festival. Send your images to support@iwebquest.com to have your pictures posted in our Mt. Olympus Mythtelling Hall of Fame.   

 

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Explorations  Essential Questions  |  Stay on Task |   Great Greek Books (+)
  Quality Internet Hotlists  | Assess Your Work  |  Teaching Tips

Investigate the Ancient Greeks Explore Character Traits of the Heroes
Discover the Myth Maker in You  |  Inspire others to be Good People

 

 



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Created: July 24, 2000
Last Updated: April 12, 2004